Wise remarks, a fresh guy and dame stuff. Quick pace and a performance by James Cagney typically Cagney. These give Blonde Crazy a fast start and keep it going most of the way. Finish is weak but not enough to kill off the early impression.

Wise remarks, a fresh guy and dame stuff. Quick pace and a performance by James Cagney typically Cagney. These give Blonde Crazy a fast start and keep it going most of the way. Finish is weak but not enough to kill off the early impression.

Strictly a petty larceny guy is Cagney and all the way to the finish, when stretched out on a prison hospital cot, he hints he might go straight. Original yarn gives Cagney plenty of room for his customary fresh punk characterization.

Joan Blondell is Cagney’s business partner – and what a business – who loves him in other ways besides biz but doesn’t find that out until her marriage to a comparative nice boy proves a flop.

Everything depends on the dialog and playing both come through satisfactorily. Cagney and Blondell make a natural pair. Louis Calhern uses his long experience to good effect in a class cheater part.

Blonde Crazy

Production

Warner. Director Roy Del Ruth; Screenplay Kubec Glasmon, John Bright; Camera Ernest Haller, Sid Hickox; Editor Ralph Dawson; Music Leo F. Forbstein (dir.); Art Director Esdras Hartley

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1931. Running time: 78 MIN.

With

James Cagney Joan Blondell Louis Calhern Noel Francis Guy Kibbee Ray Milland
Follow @Variety on Twitter for breaking news, reviews and more
Post A Comment 0