Review: ‘Men Without Women’

Story and characters are built up with uncanny shrewdness. It opens in Shanghai with a shore party of American gobs going whoopee in an enormous establishment of entertainment of various kinds, mostly a vast bar and many fluttering petticoats and kimonos.

Story and characters are built up with uncanny shrewdness. It opens in Shanghai with a shore party of American gobs going whoopee in an enormous establishment of entertainment of various kinds, mostly a vast bar and many fluttering petticoats and kimonos.

Back to the ship some great views of a sub streaking out to sea at night in clouds of black smoke and weird light and water reflections. Sub is run down in a collision and goes to the bottom in 90 feet of water with all escape cut off, and here begins the sledge hammer situation that lasts to the finish. Finale is a whooping bit of flagwaving.

Kenneth MacKenna, as Chief Torpedoman Burke, does nicely with a heroic lead, but the punch of the acting is the surprise comedy bits of a number of minor characters. It is these touches and the grim comedy of the lines that lift the picture out of melodrama to an illusion of reality.

Men Without Women

Production

Fox. Director John Ford; Screenplay John Ford, James Kevin McGuinness, Dudley Nichols; Camera Joseph H. August; Editor Paul Weatherwax; Music Peter Brunellin, Glen Knight; Art Director William S. Darling

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1930. Running time: 76 MIN.

With

Kenneth MacKenna Frank Albertson Paul Page Warren Hymer Walter McGrail
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