Review: ‘Escape’

The first of a series of films made in England in conjunction with RKO. As a play John Galsworthy's Escape was a hit, but the film suffers by being made mostly with stage players, who do not generally adapt themselves to the screen. This particularly applies to Gerald Du Maurier, who over-emphasizes everything.

The first of a series of films made in England in conjunction with RKO. As a play John Galsworthy’s Escape was a hit, but the film suffers by being made mostly with stage players, who do not generally adapt themselves to the screen. This particularly applies to Gerald Du Maurier, who over-emphasizes everything.

It tells how a man is sentenced to five years for killing a policeman. The prisoner, perfect English gentleman, doesn’t like being treated roughly and escapes.

In approved Galsworthy fashion, the film draws a long simile between a hunted prisoner and foxhunting. As propaganda against bloodsports the picture achieves a certain power.

Cast carries a long list of English stage and screen names, with only Du Maurier having a long role.

Basil Dean’s direction is sympathetic; no more. Photography scores aces over the lot.

Escape

UK - US

Production

Associated Talking/RKO. Director Basil Dean; Producer Basil Dean; Screenplay Basil Dean; Camera Jack Mackenzie; Editor Milner Kitchin

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1930. Running time: 70 MIN.

With

Gerald Du Maurier Edna Best Mabel Poulton Madeleine Carroll Gordon Harker Austin Trevor
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