Review: ‘Anybody’s Woman’

The picture will appeal to some and probably not to others. Its story is an old one, basically the successful efforts of the bad, bad girl to become a good wife to a lawyer far above her station.

The picture will appeal to some and probably not to others. Its story is an old one, basically the successful efforts of the bad, bad girl to become a good wife to a lawyer far above her station.

It’s mainly the unsympathetic role handed Clive Brook that takes the big punch out of the story. It starts out far more promisingly than it develops.

Brook has just become divorced from his upper-strata wife who bolts to marry a richer man. He takes to drink to dull the effects of the jolt and is tossed into the society of the chorus girl he once defended as an attorney. She falls for his philosophy that probably a bad girl like her would make the best wife in the long run.

The social ostracism angle is also overdone, as is Ruth Chatterton’s interpretation of the tough one’s role. Her best work is in the more dramatic scenes.

Anybody's Woman

Production

Paramount. Director Dorothy Arzner; Writer Zoe Akins, Doris Anderson; Camera Charles Lang Editor Jane Loring

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1930. Running time: 80 MIN.

With

Ruth Chatterton Clive Brook Paul Lukas Huntly Gordon
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