Whole story [from the play by Frederick Lonsdale] is sentimental, a deftly manipulated series of the bunk about the good girl drawn into associations with a band of crooks, getting herself accepted into society so they can prey upon the rich, the girl all the time retaining the chaste and delicate spirit of a nun.

Whole story [from the play by Frederick Lonsdale] is sentimental, a deftly manipulated series of the bunk about the good girl drawn into associations with a band of crooks, getting herself accepted into society so they can prey upon the rich, the girl all the time retaining the chaste and delicate spirit of a nun.

It’s bum literature but great theatre, particularly here with a splendid group of players. Norma Shearer does extremely well with the heroine. She most successfully plays the role of elegance and high breeding, the two qualities which are the key to making Mrs Cheyney plausible.

Basil Rathbone falls into a role for his casual, easy stage style, and the character of Lord Elton, composite of stupidity and meanness and the whole trick of the play’s sentimental punch, is happily in the hands of Herbert Bunston, to whom it is pie.

The picture’s finish could be made brisker.

The Last of Mrs Cheyney

Production

M-G-M. Director Sidney Franklin; Camera William Daniels

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1929. Running time: 94 MIN.

With

Norma Shearer Basil Rathbone George Barraud Herbert Bunston Hedda Hopper Moon Carroll
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