Review: ‘Disraeli’

Acting and characterization are a continuous delight, not to mention a plot that concerns the diplomatic imperativeness of possessing the Suez Canal.

Acting and characterization are a continuous delight, not to mention a plot that concerns the diplomatic imperativeness of possessing the Suez Canal.

Disraeli without George Arliss is to shudder. The professional equipment of the central figure carries and dominates both plot and conversation [from the play by Louis N. Parker].

Warners have done it right. Production is unstinted, sedate, and colorful, in the style of 1874. Small bits as well as principal roles are equally meritorious. Florence Arliss, wife of the star, plays his wife in the picture and makes the family circle complete by attaching runner-up honors.

Doris Lloyd as a woman spy is interesting and plausible as she weaves her little net of intrigue. She proves the ‘menace’ to the plan to purchase the big ditch through Egypt.

1929/30: Best Actor (George Arliss).

Nominations: Best Picture, Writing

Disraeli

Production

Warner. Director Alfred E. Green; Screenplay Julian Josephson; Camera Lee Garmes

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1929. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

George Arliss Joan Bennett Florence Arliss Anthony Bushell David Torrence Doris Lloyd
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading