Review: ‘The Shopworn Angel’

Once in a long while the formula picture factories in Hollywood turn out a glamorous gem such as this [from a story by Dana Burnet], stirring, finely drawn, and so beautifully presented that the critical faculties declare a holiday. Nancy Carroll and Gary Cooper contribute excellent work. Both seem natural and lifelike.

Once in a long while the formula picture factories in Hollywood turn out a glamorous gem such as this [from a story by Dana Burnet], stirring, finely drawn, and so beautifully presented that the critical faculties declare a holiday. Nancy Carroll and Gary Cooper contribute excellent work. Both seem natural and lifelike.

As the showgirl Daisy living with the worldly sophisticate (Paul Lukas), with nothing to worry over except booze headaches and bawling the dance director when asked to come to rehearsals on time, Carroll never strays from type. She’s hard, smart and strong-willed.

The soldier boy, William Tyler (Cooper), is from Texas where he never saw a show girl or a skyscraper first hand. He bumps into Daisy accidentally, is driven to camp in her limousine, and then brags to the gang. She later weakens enough to get the soldier out of the mess.

Only two dialog sequences in the picture, both highly effective. First is the marriage ceremony; Cooper has a few brief lines. In the second the dance director is putting the chorus through the paces; Carroll has a few lines here and also sings. The girl’s voice records surprisingly well.

Lukas, a Hungarian imported by Paramount over a year ago, is a smooth, most nonchalant and likeable heavy.

The Shopworn Angel

Production

Paramount. Director Richard Wallace; Screenplay Howard Estabrook, Albert Shelby LeVino

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1928. Running time: 80 MIN.

With

Nancy Carroll Gary Cooper Paul Lukas
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