Doug Fairbanks is at it again. The story of The Gaucho is credited on the screen to Elton Thomas, but that person is none other than Doug. In doing so, however, he does not hog the picture, but permits a little Mexican girl, new to films, in on the racket.

Doug Fairbanks is at it again. The story of The Gaucho is credited on the screen to Elton Thomas, but that person is none other than Doug. In doing so, however, he does not hog the picture, but permits a little Mexican girl, new to films, in on the racket.

This youngster, who got her first shot at screen work on the Roach lot, is Lupe Velez, and is not more than 16 or 17.

Though the first 30 minutes or so seem a little slow, the picture then settles down. Looks as though better than $500,000 has been expended, and the picture shows it.

To please the little mountain girl, the Gaucho has a house moved from its base by 100 horses to the town he has come to take because there is an abundance of gold there. The big punch is a stampede of cattle to save the day for the Gaucho. A tremendous herd sweeps the town, driving everything and everybody before it, with the Gaucho and his mob coming in and taking possession on the dust. A pip of a scene.

The Gaucho

Production

Elton/United Artists. Director F. Richard Jones; Producer Douglas Fairbanks; Screenplay Lotta Woods, Elton Thomas [= Douglas Fairbanks]; Camera Tony Gaudio; Editor William Nolan; Art Director Carl Oscar Borg

Crew

Silent. (Color) Extract of a review from 1927. Running time: 102 MIN.

With

Douglas Fairbanks Lupe Velez Gustav von Seyffertitz Michael Vavitch Nigel de Brulier Mary Pickford
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