Review: ‘Mare Nostrum’

Mare Nostrum (Our Sea) is a war picture. It's war stuff from a naval angle and not too potent in the telling.

Mare Nostrum (Our Sea) is a war picture. It’s war stuff from a naval angle and not too potent in the telling.

Mare Nostrum was a book (by Blasco Ibanez); but those viewing it with no memories and an open mind are liable to find in the story many uninteresting passages plus the handicap of not a single principal character either demanding or holding sympathy. Thus almost immediately the ‘love interest’ is debatable, inasmuch as the woman in the case, Freya (Alice Terry) is a German spy, and the man, Ulysses (Antonio Moreno), a Spanish sea captain who deserts his home for her.

Ingram remained abroad a long time to make this one, and few will deny that he has turned out a picturesque gem. Barcelona, Pompeii, Naples, Marseilles – they’re all there ‘in the flesh’, and it’s pretty work. But landscapes can’t and don’t make a picture which runs just five minutes short of two hours.

Mare Nostrum

Production

MGM. Director Rex Ingram; Producer Rex Ingram; Screenplay Willis Goldbeck; Camera John F. Seitz; Editor Grant Whytock; Art Director Ben Carre

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1926. Running time: 113 MIN.

With

Alice Terry Antonio Moreno Alex Nova
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading