Review: ‘Mantrap’

Clara Bow just walks away with the picture from the moment she steps into camera range. Every minute that she is in it she steals it from such a couple of corking troupers as Ernest Torrence and Percy Marmont. In this particular role, that of a fast-working, slang-slinging manicurist from a swell barber shop in Minneapolis, who marries the big hick from the Canadian wilds, she is fitted just like a glove. The picture itself is a wow for laughs, action and corking titles.

Clara Bow just walks away with the picture from the moment she steps into camera range. Every minute that she is in it she steals it from such a couple of corking troupers as Ernest Torrence and Percy Marmont. In this particular role, that of a fast-working, slang-slinging manicurist from a swell barber shop in Minneapolis, who marries the big hick from the Canadian wilds, she is fitted just like a glove. The picture itself is a wow for laughs, action and corking titles.

The story [from the novel by Sinclair Lewis] deals with a lawyer who is a divorce specialist, sick and tired of vamping females who come to his office with their troubles. To be rid of them he decides to go up into the Canadian wilds.

The contrast to the lawyer character is the owner of a trading store in the lonely country, who is woman-hungry and who goes to Minneapolis, wins himself the flip little manicure girl and takes her back to the wilds.

Mantrap

Production

Paramount. Director Victor Fleming; Producer B.P. Schulberg, Hector Turnbull; Screenplay Adelaide Heilbron, Ethel Doherty, George Marion Jr.; Camera James [Wong] Howe

Crew

Silent. (B&W) Extract of a review from 1926. Running time: 68 MIN.

With

Ernest Torrence Clara Bow Percy Marmont Eugene Pallette
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