Tumbleweed s marks Bill Hart's return to the screen following his long lapse through a disagreement with Famous Players over policy. It's a welcome return. Bill Hart is seen here under a new banner, a new hat and on a new horse.

Tumbleweed s marks Bill Hart’s return to the screen following his long lapse through a disagreement with Famous Players over policy. It’s a welcome return. Bill Hart is seen here under a new banner, a new hat and on a new horse.

This is a typical Hart western, although the story carries something of a different angle on the open country. Its punch is a stampede of homesteaders to claim-stake the Cherokee Strip, an area undoubtedly famed in the annals of the Old West, as Hart is fastidious on the authenticity of his pictures.

The heroine, not getting into any serious difficulties, has eliminated the need of any ultra-heroic measures to save her and for that matter the love theme of the tale may be said to be secondary to its historical interest.

Tumbleweeds

Production

Hart/United Artists. Director King Baggot; Producer William S. Hart; Screenplay C. Gardner Sullivan, Hal G. Evarts; Camera Joseph August

Crew

Silent. (B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1925. Running time: 76 MIN.

With

William S. Hart Barbara Bedford Lucien Littlefield J. Gordon Russell Richard R. Neill
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