Rex Ingram's Scaramouche [from the novel by Rafael Sabatini] is a big feature. Comparisons cannot be made with his Four Horsemen, as it is an entirely different type of story.

Rex Ingram’s Scaramouche [from the novel by Rafael Sabatini] is a big feature. Comparisons cannot be made with his Four Horsemen, as it is an entirely different type of story.

Adhering closely to historical fact, the story tells of a youth in love with a titled lady, also sought by a marquis who holds domination over that portion of France. The boy sees his chum murdered in a duel by the marquis, the only explanation being given is that his friend, who was studying for the clergy, could talk too well. The story then carries the boy through the various stages of French history up to the breaking of the revolution in Paris.

Andre, the boy, is brought into the French Assembly. It is here that Ingram makes many truly worthwhile long shots, the galleries filled with the bedlam, the white-wigged aristocrats and then the deputies of the people.

Navarro’s performance has a sincere boyishness coupled with natural good looks. Alice Terry not only is beautiful in the white wig and gowns of the period, but she gives a capable performance as well.

Scaramouche

Production

Metro. Director Rex Ingram; Screenplay Willis Goldbeck; Camera John F. Seitz; Editor Grant Whytock; Music Ernst Litz

Crew

Silent. (B&W) Extract of a review from 1923. Running time: 132 MIN.

With

Ramon Novarro Alice Terry Lewis Stone Lloyd Ingraham Julia Swayne Gordon
Follow @Variety on Twitter for breaking news, reviews and more
Post A Comment 0