Review: ‘Fury’

Fury is a great story as screened, coupling a corking touch of humor here and there through a story that is replete with action and heart interest.

Fury is a great story as screened, coupling a corking touch of humor here and there through a story that is replete with action and heart interest.

Fury has a little touch of the strength of Madame X in it, only in this instance the boy discovers his mother who was lured away and tackles the man who seduced her.

The tale is laid in the Limehouse district of London and the wharves of Glasgow, with the star on board the Lady Spray, his father being the master of the craft. The father is embittered at the world due to the fact that his wife deserted him for another man.

Then on shore there is revealed Dorothy Gish. She is her same flip, half humorous, half pathetic self as of yore, with the first-mate of the Lady Spray and the master’s son both trying to win her. The latter is one that she favors and finally she consents to go to Glasgow to meet him there and marry. It is on that trip along the coast that the father dies and places into the hands of his son the task of finding the man responsible for his mother’s downfall.

Through it all Richard Barthelmess as the boy carries with him a certain wistfulness bound to appeal, especially with Gish acting as an excellent foil for his work.

Fury

Production

Inspiration/First National. Director Henry King; Screenplay Edmund Goulding; Camera Roy Overbaugh; Editor Duncan Mansfield; Art Director Robert M. Haas

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1923. Running time: 116 MIN.

With

Richard Barthelmess Tyrone Power Pat Hartigan Barry Macollum Dorothy Gish
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading