Review: ‘Stella Maris’

In Stella Maris, a screen adaption of the novel of the same title, originally written by William J. Locke, and picturized by Frances Marion, Mary Pickford is given an opportunity to act which proves a revelation. There are two characters in Locke's story of great importance. One is Stella Maris and the other Unity Blake. Pickford plays them both.

In Stella Maris, a screen adaption of the novel of the same title, originally written by William J. Locke, and picturized by Frances Marion, Mary Pickford is given an opportunity to act which proves a revelation. There are two characters in Locke’s story of great importance. One is Stella Maris and the other Unity Blake. Pickford plays them both.

In the former she is the sweet ingenue type one expects her to be, but in the latter she is a deformed little slatternly slavey. Stella Maris is a sweet child, an orphan, crippled in her nether limbs from birth. Her parents were wealthy and left her well provided for.

As Unity Blake she sees nothing but the harder side of the world’s face, for Unity is also an orphan and the inmate of a home. John Risca (Conway Tearle) is the hero.

It is a production for which the director, Marshall Neilan, must receive unstinted credit. It is a revelation in exterior locations and interior settings and the titling is exceedingly clever.

Stella Maris

Production

Artcraft. Director Marshall Neilan; Screenplay Frances Marion; Camera Walter Stradling

Crew

Silent. (B&W) Extract of a review from 1918. Running time: 77 MIN.

With

Mary Pickford Conway Tearle Camille Ankewich Ida Waterman Herbert Standing
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