Mickey and Mabel Normand are one and the same. With all her tomboy pranks and cutting up, she is a wonderful little actress.

Mickey and Mabel Normand are one and the same. With all her tomboy pranks and cutting up, she is a wonderful little actress.

The opening scenes are those of the usual cut-and-dry western. But this illusion is dispelled as soon as Normand makes her appearance. Mickey’s garments consist of an old pair of trousers, patched, a heavy flannel undershirt and a discarded waistcoat, many sizes too large for her. She lives with her uncle and his squaw housekeeper. He is working a mine at the opening of the picture, getting very little pay dirt, and they are not even prosperous, but they are a happy trio.

But Mickey’s life in the wild and woolly west comes to an end when her uncle receives an invitation to send her east to some relations, who have a country home on Long Island. She goes there, but when these folks learn Mickey has no money they put her to work. As a domestic she is a rank failure and disrupts the whole household.

Throughout the picture she does a number of daring and intrepid stunts. The photography adds special interest to the picture. The cast supporting Normand is splendid and the whole production [made two years earlier, in 1916] breezes along, with action every minute.

Mickey

Production

Normand/Serrett. Director F. Richard Jones; Producer Mack Sennett; Screenplay J.G. Hawks; Camera Frank Williams; Music Neil Moret

Crew

Silent. (B&W) Extract of a review from 1918. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Mabel Normand Wheeler Oakman Lew Cody Minta Durfee
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