Review: ‘The Immigrant’

The two-reeler opens up showing Charlie leaning over the [boat's] rail apparently seasick. It develops he is fishing and lands a one-pounder in mid-ocean. Then he is seen shooting craps and going through all the gyrations of a baseball pitcher every time he 'shoots the bones'. The rocking and pitching of the vessel furnish unlimited opportunity for his style of comedy.

The two-reeler opens up showing Charlie leaning over the [boat’s] rail apparently seasick. It develops he is fishing and lands a one-pounder in mid-ocean. Then he is seen shooting craps and going through all the gyrations of a baseball pitcher every time he ‘shoots the bones’. The rocking and pitching of the vessel furnish unlimited opportunity for his style of comedy.

There is a little heart-interest story, when he befriends a young girl and her mother who have been robbed of their small hoard. Later – all too soon, however – he is seen in New York, broke. He spies a quarter on the street and enters a restaurant to eat. There he meets the girl he befriended on shipboard. She is also down and out, her mother having died.

The $670,000 a year funnyman is still ‘there’. The extremely limited number of titles speaks volumes for the pantomimic art of the comedian.

The Immigrant

Production

Mutual. Director Charles Chaplin; Screenplay Charles Chaplin; Camera William C. Foster, Rollie Totheroh

Crew

Silent. (B&W) Extract of a review from 1917. Running time: 30 MIN.

With

Charles Chaplin Eric Campbell Edna Purviance Henry Bergman Albert Austin
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading